Saturday, May 7, 2011

His Becomes Ours



"What do you mean, 'Move over!' I was here first."

Mr. Whiskers looks like a Maine Coon, but his actual pedigree is questionable. Nevertheless he has the confidence of royalty. In his seven-plus years, it has not occurred to him that he does not have every right to enjoy any corner of Beech Croft that appeals to him
at any time.

Many years ago a sermon based on Tennyson's "The Lord of Burleigh" struck a deep chord. Rev. Reese told us about the village maiden and the artist falling in love and marrying, and how the groom took his bride home without revealing who he was. When they entered h
is ancestral home he explained, "All of this is mine and thine." The message was that the Lord Jesus, like the Lord of Burleigh, will bring His bride home and will share all that is His with those who love and serve Him.

Years later I read the complete poem and was crushed to learn the lady had died while still quite young, never able to feel worthy of the privileges she'd been granted through marriage. If she'd only had a barn cat to show her how to adjust...

It's a
lesson most Christians will likely grapple with until we are with Christ. We have amazing promises - in writing - ours for the taking. The answer we need is before our eyes on the printed page. Thrilled with the assurance, we receive it and praise Him, but... if the evidence doesn't show up quickly, we slip into the mindset of that village maiden. It's there for others, but not for me. Only a special few get answers like that.

The Apostle Paul told the Philippians God would supply ALL their needs. That about covers it... except we cannot dictate how or when. Regardless, with Christ we have eternity without sorrow or pain, and the present with spring flowers blooming and tiny leaves appearing. If we take our cue from the resident Maine Coon, it's all ours. Just trust and enjoy.

9 comments:

  1. Promises in writing indeed! Thanks for this reminder and perspective, Mary. Cats can be good teachers too...

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  2. Mary, what a needed reminder that the gospel is truly GOOD NEWS. That in Christ we have all we need and need not add anything!
    God bless!
    Michele D

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  3. I love how your cat teaches us lessons. (And haven't you actually gone out and bought tinted contacts for HRH? What cat is born such gorgeous turquoise eyes?)

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  4. Your Mr. Whiskers feels assured of his place in the home and with that grants you a space as well. Room for all and contentment.
    Erica

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  5. What beautiful, wise, luminous eyes Mr. Whiskers has! And what a friend...Isn't it amazing what we can learn from God's creatures! Eternity sounds so inviting. Thanks for the reminder, Mary! A lovely post. x

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  6. Thank you, Mary, for the reminder that sometimes we think too much and talk ourselves out of what is ours thanks to Christ's work on the cross.

    I love the way you have brought God's truth out through the example of Whiskers. He is indeed a prince among cats!

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  7. Philip Yancey, the multiple Gold Medallion winning author and editor-at-large of Christianity Today, is presenting two seminars in Toronto on July 01, 2011. The Bayview Glen Church (300 Steeles Ave East) will host the lecture "Communicating Faith to a Skeptical Society" from 8:30 am to 12:00 Noon and the Queensway Cathedral (1536 The Queensway) will host the talk "What Good is God? In search of Faith that matters" from 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm. There will be opportunities for Q&A and Book signing at both these events. The events are free, but RSVP may be required. Please visit the site: www.focusinfinity.org for more information.

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  8. Mary - I'm so glad you had your blog addie at the bottom of your last email. I can see I have reading ahead of me. Your cat is beautiful. I think I've seen him in your back yard. But, now I'll pay more attention. His name suits him.

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  9. That's a great story... and a great lesson. You're right that too often we read Scripture and think "not us." Or we think in generalities, like "Christ died for everyone," not "Christ died for ME." We need to personalize the promises God gives us. :)

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